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made without a miranda warning or made while he's not really competent between times when he's sedated and not sedated. so they may be risking their death penalty, but they may be doing it for a good reason. they may need realtime intelligence, but i don't think that the public safety exception will stand up for allowing them not to have given the miranda warnings. >> fascinating. in fact, i have a lot of questions about that i'm going to get to. and actually i want to bring in another colleague as well right now. steve razor is a former military judge advocate general and knows a thing or two about this military issue. typically, steve, we hear about a 48-hour window and this is a very new area of justice. this has only been in sort of parlay for the last couple of years. we are far outside of that 48 hours by today. but can it be extended in the case of public safety? and exactly when can you establish that a public safety exemption has expired or is no longer of concern? how long can you keep him from getting miranda? >> well, there's no hard and fast rule on that. and that's exactl
to the miranda rule. they've not advised him of his rights. so they can only ask about potential threats to public safety. were there other conspirators, other bombs out there, any reason to believe that public safety is in any way jeopardized. >> pete, one of the persons cited in terms of this idea that there may have been more violent plans on order at the hands of the brothers is this person who was hijacked by the brothers on thursday night. and the driver of a mercedes suv. we know that he's been cooperating with police. is there anything else that we know about his involvement in all of this? >> yeah, the business about new york is very iffy, frankly. i've emailed briefly with this person. he claims that he escaped with they stopped at a gasoline station. but he's also told the police that he was told by these two men, that they were the marathon bombers. but that they were not going to kill him because he was not an american. what he told the police was, that he thought they were speaking arabic. that's probably not the case, they were probably speaking russian or some dialect. an
, everyone grows with racle-gro. >>> there was no miranda warning given. that they were claiming a public safety exception. could we get an explanation for that. >> there is a public safety exemption in cases of national security and charges involving acts of terrorism and so the government has that opportunity right now, though i believe that the suspect has been taken to a hospital. >> you heard it right there. no miranda rights were read to the suspect here last night. a justice department official says the bombing suspect won't be read the miranda rights because of a public saflt exception. so what is the next judicial step? let's ask the executive director of the american center for law and justice. good morning. i think a lot of folks are not familiar with this public safety exemption. why invoke that at this time? >> usually it's rare, it would be an instance where there is a gun or some kind of in this situation, unexploded bombs. it's important for people to understand, this is not the most extreme move. what you get from this is very limited interrogation and on top of that, it
miranda rights to keep him in a gray area right now whether or not he would be considered an enemy combatant or information that he would be allowing to investigators may not be used against him if he were try to be tried as an american civilian. as i talked there with roger about the fact that congressman peter king over the weekend said the homeland is the battlefield and that times have really changed, what are your thoughts about what the congressman has said about the fbi and that they may have missed red flags and the fact that the homeland is the battlefield? >> as you know, thomas, the fbi conducts thousands of interviews like this. i will say that they do a good job. i would say unless there was some evidence that would lead them to not do something to this individual, i would say they did a good job. i think my colleague, peter king, is not just monday morning quarterbacking but arm chair quarterbacking. we don't no what our investigative authorities know. i would say let them do their job. we can comment but when we start pointing fingers, i think we just add to the conf
his miranda rights, read miranda rights just getting that as you were wrapping up. adam housley live in boston. adam, thank you. investigators are furiously trying to track down the terrorism connection to this case. and they are focusing on a trip, the older brother made last year. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge is here tonight with an update on that. good evening, catherine. >> thank you, bret. some of the most compelling evidence and preliminary evidence comes from surveillance video and one eyewitness during that carjacking thursday night before a shootout with police one of the brothers said, quote: did you hear about the boston explosion? i did that. court records filed monday show the tsarnaev brothers walked into boylston street together 11 minutes before the explosions, each with a backpack. they split up. one heading for the finish line and the other toward the forum restaurant, the site of the second explosion. 30 seconds before the first blast. the started fidgeting with cell phone after the blast almost everyone turned around, quote: apparent bewil
going that route. >> shepard: he matter of reading him his miranda rights. the right to remain silent. there's an exception put into place in 1984 and the intent was, what if somebody placed -- for instance, placed some bombs out there, brought them into custody but more bombs are about to go off you need them to be compelled to speak right now. while waiting to read them their miranda rights. that's an ambiguous thing. do you have a sense now that period of time, whatever it is, has passed and it's time for us to deal with the constitution? >> the theory behind this exception is that the puck is at risk, and the public is so much at risk that the potential defendant's constitutional liberties must be negated. but that doesn't make sense what the same people i just tick off said, the governor, mayor, police, and police commission economy head of the fbi, all said on friday night, boston's back to normal. the public is no longer at recollection. they can't have it both ways. >> shepard: they're trying to. >> can't claim bostones back to normal and the public is not at risk and then say
to not or blank or turned his head. if it was given prior to the reading of his miranda rights, it would probably be unlikely they would use that against him in court. if it was used voluntarily afterwards, likely he would. about the fact he has lawyered up, most likely we could send the information probably came prior to his reading of the miranda rights. we don't know that right now. >> thank you very much indeed. an extraordinary court session took place inside his hospital room. a transcript of that hearing tonight that tells us about the accused bomber and the case. jason, tell us what happens, it is fascinating. >> it really is and it is an nine page transcript we got hold of. what i can tell you is this proceeding lasted about ten or 15 minutes, started about 11:30 this morning. all of the key figures came into the hospital room and all of them introduce themselves. you had the u.s. judge there and attorneys from both sides. a court reporter there as well. and everyone present wanted to make sure that he knew exactly what was going on, know about the charges that he is facing. let me read
. >> let's talk about the issue a lot of people have been talking about. not everybody, but some. miranda rights. we've watched enough detective shows no know, police shows, they give miranda rights almost like blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. it's done. why do you think that's an issue? now we just got the word as we went on the air tonight the defendant here, the suspect, i guess he's a defendant now, has been given his miranda rights. >> this is truly something of an urban legend. people like to watch shows where a criminal goes free because he wasn't given miranda rights. that's extremely rare. i do criminal defense work. i can tell you, the most you can hope for in a miranda case is one or two statements will not make it into court. it's rare the whole case falls out unless everything -- >> so it's not the poison fruit thing? >> there is a poison fruit provision, standard. but it's very rare for it to pollute an entire case. >> let me ask you practically, why don't the law enforcement officials, the federal officials up there who have him in custody at the hospital, why didn't they just
with as a consequence as an enemy combatant or enemy belligerent which would involve delaying his miranda rights. >> you don't want to turn over intelligence gathering over to a criminal attorney. under the law, there is no right to legal counsel when you are egg being questioned for national security purposes. i hope the obama administration will allow us that and they have a bad track record. >> and this is not the course the administration will take. they will take reading him his rights after national security exception has run out and prosecuting him in a federal court as well. >> molly: thank you. >> megyn: more breaking news. news reporting that federal charges have now been filed against the surviving suspect. though they are reportedly being filed under seal. that means we don't get to see them. they will have to let it's know what the charges are but perhaps not all the supporting information. in a case of this magnitude there is no way they are going to keep the charges private and not public. in other words, what exactly has he been charged with? a terrorist act, using weapons of mass destru
can he be questioned before the public safety runs out, most say 48 hours. once under miranda he is under no obligation to cooperate with authorities. >> remember the number one goal right here is to get inside his head and get whatever intelligence he has with any operatives in the united states to protect the homeland and protect americans inside the united states. >> reporter: speaking this morning on fox news, former u.s. attorney general alberto gonzales suggested being mirandized will not necessarily close off the flow of information from tsnaraev. >> we have something we can give him which is his life. for example, taking the death penalty off the i believe at that. there is possible some kind of deal would be made where he provides information and in exchange for that the government gives him some kind of a plea agreement. >> reporter: gonzalez suspects what may be happening now is in the obama administration is a quote, interagency scrum where some are pushing for a quick mirandizing. others may be advocating a delay so as much information as possible can be garnered, ma
'll give him a lawyer, lawyer up, get miranda. >> oh, yeah. now, a couple of things about that. they have suggested that there's an exception to miranda for public safety which we all know there is. i think they've been very extravagant in assuming they'll get the largest possible exception under the law and the reality is in different circuits that exception is interpreted differently. >> if they think they don't have to give the guy the miranda rights, you have the right to remain silent and right to an attorney, they think we have a big exemption, before they wofer that and try to get all of the information from the person and it may come back to bite them because some jurisdictions don't see it that way. >> absolutely right. in some places if you're a dangerous offender you get a long exception. in others, it doesn't matter how dangerous you are, if police basically rendered you-- >> what should happen. if we identify the person what do you think as a doj think next. >> in the person fits the definition of enany combatant, al-qaeda affiliate or someone we're at war with, that presiden
controversy over miranda rights now pretty much moot. he's been read his rights. he has a lawyer. so that -- that part of the controversy seems to be -- that part of the issue seems to be put aside at this moment. >> let me go to don, michael. when you read the complaint and it says about their homemade bombs, let's go back to what michael was just talking about in the ieds. the complaint says they threw at least two small improvised explosive devices, ieds, out of the car and intact low-grade device was discovered inside the car in addition from the scene of the shootout. the fbi has recovered two unexploded ieds as well as the remnants of numerous exploded ieds. now, does this say to you, when we read numerous exploded ieds, does that support the idea that they planned more attacks to you, don? >> well, you know, al, i think right off the bat, when you look at this circumstance here, clearly this was a planned attack. it not only was a planned attack by the activities that they went about, but if you go back and look, years and months gone back at how these people operated and so o
reading him miranda rights. what does that mean for any information they might be getting? >> well, it's very important to the people -- we've been talking a lot about miranda and i think it's important for people to understand what it does and doesn't mean. if you are questioned without your miranda rights, all that means is that the statements you make cannot be used against you in a criminal court. they can be used against other people. they can be used as leads to other inquiries. and you can still be prosecuted with lots of other evidence. all it means is that those statements cannot be used against you. from what it certainly appears there is lots of other evidence against this fellow. so the fact that the government might be giving up the chance to use some of it is not much of a sacrifice on the part of the government. >> he also at this point could indicate he wants an attorney and doesn't want to answer any questions, correct? >> absolutely. even when someone doesn't get miranda rights, the statements still have to be voluntary. he can't be tortured. he can't be waterboarded.
negotiation with the fbi he gives himself up. >> right. >> they arrest him. they don't read him his miranda rights. explain. >> i'm not great on this. my understanding with the fbi and the federal authorities is that it's a terrorist act that they don't get certain rights that the rest of us would be afforded. they wanted to make sure that if we did speak with him that he wouldn't be given his miranda rights and something else kicked in. he was just -- >> you were told this in advance. if you found the guy, your officers are not going to read him his miranda rights. >> this never played out. there was no interviewing at the scene. he needed aid. >> he was in no position to talk. >> exactly. >> he was a very weak -- did he mumble anything? did he say anything? did he give any political statements? >> my understanding is he didn't have anything to say. i don't know for sure. >> what about during the 20-minute negotiation with the fbi when they were working out his surrender? did he make any statements that could be useful? >> no. i'm not aware of any statements. i think it was more he was fin
be read his miranda rights. moving past the politics of it because it seems to get a little poe lit kal, as a former member of fbi how does whether or not the suspect is read his miranda rights influence or impact your investigation? >> it really becomes irrelevant. good report-based interviewers and interrogators who are the ones most effective. the fbi doesn't do that because we're nice. we do that because it worked. in reported based interviewers miranda they can read that and continue. it is not a major obstacle. it is almost irrelevant. jenna: really? we're hearing a it is a major issue whether we get to the bottom of this investigation. so what should we consider as we continue to hear the debate ongoing over the next several days? >> it doesn't, it really doesn't make that much difference to the interviewers and especially the particular group of profile he is -- profilers they developed at quantico, at the fbi academy. this is not terribly relevant. they can sit down with the people. they can interview them. they look for behavioral cues. they look for a way to establish a relat
tsarnaev the 19-year-old surviving suspect be interrogated. should he get his miranda warnings against self-incrimination. tried in a is civilian court or military tribunal. before we go there let's start with the latest from the scene and why craig and a i immediately recognized the pressure cooker bombs. we have seen them many times before. here is craig's crime time report. >> reporter: the quiet streets of watertown became a war zone as the boston marathon bombers made their last stand here. homes can be seen riddled with bullets. this black mark from a pressure cooker bomb, one just like the one that was used to kill three people, wounding 180. >> there was two cars. black suv and a green looked like honda accord. had some bags that he was one of the guys was lighting things and throwing them. had fuses and they would explode but you also lots of shoot going on. >> brothers dhokhar 19 and 26-year-old tamerlan starr tsarnaev add to the marathon death toll, killing police officer shawn collier in cold blood. >> the police officer that was killed you said it was a massacre. >> assassinati
suspect as enemy combat tant. remember, he wasn't read his miranda rights. what would it mean? and why is it important? the constitutional attorney will weigh in on this when we come back. morning, brian! loveour passat! um. listen, gary. i bought the lt one. nice try. says right here you can get one for $199 a month. you can't believe the lame-stream media, gary. they're all gone. maybe i'll get one. [ male announcer ] now everyone's going to want one. you can't have the same car as me, gary! i'm gett' one. nope! [ male announcer ] volkswagen springtoberfest is here and there's no better time to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. right now lease one of four volkswagen models for under $200 a month. visit vwdealer.com today. the battle of bataan, 1942. [ all ] fort benning, georgia, in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto-insurance
be charged as early as today. investigators have not read him his miranda rights unwhat they call the public safety exception clause. so they may use any information he reveals as evidence in court. let's bring in christopher tritico, he defended the oklahoma city bomber, timothy mcveigh. christopher, thanks very much for coming in. he is a u.s. citizen. he was -- he received his naturalized citizenship last september 11th, of all dates. he's obviously in a hospital. crime was committed in the united states. if they don't read him his miranda rights right away, you okay with that? >> well, look. i think the public safety exception is being greatly and overly expanded in this instance. the public safety exception as the supreme court laid out is for an instance when an officer walks up on a situation and sees an empty holster and says where's your gun. that's to prevent an imminent threat from happening right then. what they are doing now is really expanding that public safety exception to say really the fifth amendment applies when they say it does and i don't think the supreme court is goin
not get his miranda rights. >> among of group of republicans calling for the boston bombing suspect to be considered an enemy combatant. that means he would not have the same constitutional protection as a regular citizen, with regard to what he says as the investigation moves forward. will this happen? california congressman, a senior member of the intelligence committee. congressman, always good to see you. i know that you disagree with the congressman and think that the suspect is in custody. is entitled to his miranda rights. why? >> well, i think the administration is handling it exactly correct. there is a public safety exception under the miranda allowing law enforcement to interview him, making sure there are no other bombs, threats, perpetrators still out there giving the law enforcement flexibility to do the that prior to miranda and i think the court will interpret it broadly and give them the time they need to make sure that the public is safe. after that, he will have to be mirandized, doesn't mean the end of cooperation, but no basis yet to conclude they should be trea
analyst. the 19-year-old has not been read his miranda rights. why does this matter what has it allowed for? what is the issue here? >> a lot of variables here, the question is he in any kwan condition to answer questions with or without miranda? what is his health situation? also, even if he doesn't get miranda warnings, he may decline to answer questions in any case. they can't force him to answer questions, but if he does not receive miranda warnings and if he then anticipates questions those answers cannot be used in a criminal case against him. they can be used for intelligence gathering. they can be used if there are other conspirators who may be prosecuted, can't be used against him. other evidence can be used against him. may be lots of other evidence. if you don't get miranda warnings, your statements i can't be used against you. >> so this is a sensitive issue. another sensitive issue raised by republican senators, lindsey graham, kelly ayotte, peter king, they released a statement, the suspect, based upon his actions, clearly is a good candidate for enemy combat tant status.
gathering purposes since he's been president. when we read these people their miranda rights and give them a lawyer the only way you can gather intelligence is if the terror suspect and the lawyer will allow you to do so. intelligence gathering through plea bargaining is not going to make us safe. jenna: so we spoke to a former member of the fbi on our show yesterday that seems to not have a problem with miranda rights, that is their opinion. we'll see what they get as far as information from this one suspect. >> can i mention something. jenna: please. >> i don't have a problem with miranda rights. this man can only be tried in federal court. he's never eligible for military commissions. a first year law student could convict this person. what i'm worried about is what does he know about future attacks? he's telling us that his brother was the bad guy, he's sort of just along for the ride. they had no international connections. guess what, he's down-playing his involvement. what i am suggesting is that we use the national security legal system where we can interview him without a lawyer to
's miranda rights. they said he could still pose a threat either because there are more bombs planted out there or he's connected to a larger terrorist cell. either way it has some lawmakers concerned. as investigators continue to interrogate their suspect some lawmakers argue he should be treated as an enemy combatant and denied an attorney for the time being. >> we should be allowed her intelligence-gathering purposes. >> investigators say they're still uncertain whether zocor and his brother tamerlan who died in a shoot-out on friday with police have any ties to fore te union issued a statement saying we must not waver from our tried and true justice system even in the most difficult of times. denial of rights is un-american and will only make it harder to obtain fair convictions. some liberal lawmakers agree and said they would be comfortable with tsarnaev being designated as an enemy combatant. >> i don't believe. it would beunconstitutional to >> it carries its own risk especially if that suspect is an american citizen. it could be challenged in court and that
is remote. >> right. you know, judge, a lot of people h ve been talking about miranda, the public safety exception. i don't want to spend a lot of time on that. but, you know, when the police announced that the public threat was over, once dzhokhar was taken into custody, doesn't that suggest that the public safety exception doesn't kick in, or has been solidified? >> the public safety exception is in no way applicable in this case. that was for a situation where there was a gun in a public place and the police needed to know where it was. they asked the guy they just caught where's the gun before where was the gun? >>> they asked where is the gun. >> be that as it may you have a public defender in boston who is chomping at the bit to appoint a federal judge to defend the suspect. you could reassign a public defender is he or sheable to come in and say i don't want you talking to my client? >> he or she can say that. it's not going to stop this trying to do is to collect intelligence. i'm sure that if that's what they're trying to do, they will simply continue to do it, and gather only
washington, the decision to read the boston bombing suspect his miranda rights. last hour, lindsay graham and kel i iote said is there is no way a defense lawyer is going to let dzhokar tsarnaev talk any more without taking the death penalty off the table. he has been in custody for 60 hours which the feds decided to read him his miranda rates. joining us is mercedes cowlin and you had such different reactions to this. right is ticked off that his miranda rights were yesterday red to him. he can't speak we're told like a one word, yes or one word no, the left is ticked off it took him as long as it did to read the miranda rights. >> first of all, i to give kudos for calling it an act of terrorism to the obama administration like they called hassan workplace violence. bottom line, if they don't want to use the statements a this guy makes in a criminal prosecution, they can ask him questions all day long without murnd. they can do it after he gets a lawyer as long as a clean team, a team that is is not involved in the criminal prosecution goes in and asks intelligence related questions that
and lucid enough to get his miranda rights read to him, also thoughts he shot himself through the neck, that's been really brought into question now, as an eyewitness there to help take him down, looks like a cut or maybe something exploded, a shrapnel cut, those that the boston marathon, those that suffered during the explosion. he said i'm motivated by religion, that religion being islamic extremism or islam. he went on to say i have no outside ties. i'm not part of a larger group. isn't that convenient. >>steve: both brothers went to a mosque in cambridge. it was the older brother. clearly the younger brother was following the older brother in life in so many different ways. we told you a little bit yesterday about some of the outbursts the older brother had at the mosque in cambridge. for instance, back in november where they were talking about it was okay for muslims to celebrate american holidays like thanksgiving and the 4th of july and tamerlan, the older brother, stood up and argued. then in january there was a praise for martin luther king jr. and he got up and called someone a hyp
in the decision. but they detoured not too far over. >> the decision not to read him his miranda rights even though at one point you see him getting out of the boat, in that picture he is conscience. how did that decision come about? >> this is a federal case involving a terrorism situation and i was not aware that in the federal system there can be a removal or a discontinuation of miranda rights in emergency situations. so that's exactly what happened. the united states attorney's office advised us not to administer miranda rights. we gave that information out to our officers and i think all law enforcement was operating under those rules of engagement. >> back to the apartment real quickly. there were devices found in the apartment but you can't comment on what? >> no, i didn't say that. i can't comment on any evidence that was found there. sglp anything that was found in the apartment. are you confident that these two were acting alone and that there are no more suspects out there? >> i'm confident that they were the two major actors in the violence that occurred. i am very, very sure th
of public safety exception before you give him his miranda rights, all that talk of naming him as an enemy combatant, all of that is moot right now. they've gone forward with the official proceedings. >> well, they may have used the public safety exception, and apparently they were using it to question him, and he responded in some way given his medical condition. but certainly now that he has a lawyer, that period, however long it was, is over. and you're right, the enemy combatant thing was a nonstarter from the never going to happen. this is a criminal case in federal court in massachusetts, and that's where it will stay until it's resolved one way or another. >> it's going to take a while. thanks very much, jeffrey. much more on what's going on in this boston investigation coming up here in "the situation room" 0. >>> also, another terror plot released today, new information. canadian authorities announcing the arrest of two men believed to be part of a terror plot to attack a passenger train that may have been heading towards the united states, the plot said to have an alleged connect
okayed the suspension of the suspect's miranda rights. is that a temporary suspension? >> reporter: yes, by law it is. it's called the public safety exception to the miranda rule. normally you have to tell someone they have a right to remain silent and if you don't, then you can't use anything they tell you in court. so that's why the miranda warning is given. but there is an exception. you don't have to do it if there's a possible threat to public safety. and here obviously there's a concern about whether there are potential accomplices. investigators say they haven't found any. or other explosives. they say they haven't found any of those either but that's what they want to ask him. and this exception probably begins to expire the moment you invoke it so it's probably no good for more than a day or two but nonetheless they can do that. afterwards they'll have to give him his miranda warning and say whether he'll continue to answer questions. the justice department says even in very serious cases like this, most people in custody do continue to talk. >> pete, who's going to be interrog
despite yesterday's reading of his miranda rights the federal government still holds swooifr the younger tsarnaev. negotiate ago plea deal under which he would cooperate with authorities in exchange for sparing his life remains an option. >>> the wife of the dead boston bombing suspect found out her husband and brother in law were the accused bomber the same way all americans did on tv. her lawyer claims she suspected nothing this as they ask another question was tamerlan tsarnaev involved in a 2009 triple murder. molly, we also hear that there is good news today about the victim. >> good morning, heather. two in critical condition. doctors are telling us everyone now in the hospital are expect to do survive. there were 14 patients that lost lefshs. boston medical center say many are up and walking and they are preparing for a massive exodus as they call it to rehab. many recoveries underway. investigators are looking to speak with suspect number one's wife tamerlan tsarnaev was married to katherine russell tsarnaev. they met in college in 2010 and sometime around that time converted to
ginnis in boston. thank you, susan. >>> for now federal officials have decided not to read tsarnaev his miranda rights. miranda rights inform criminals of their right to remain silent and their right to an attorney. this is allowed on a limited basis when the public may be in immediate danger, and there are those like senator lindsey graham who say tsarnaev should be consideredn enemy combatant so he can waive his right. others disagree. >> there's plenty of evidence. they don't need it to get him into a trial. i don't think we have to cross the line and say he's an enemy combatant which could be challenged in court. one circuit rules one way, one rules the other way. >> we should reserve the right to look at him as an enemy combatant and continue to look for evidence and if we find evidence and go to him as chuck says and gather intelligence. >> now the suspect's mother says tamer lan was contacted by fbi. the fbi says that is not true but the fbi did interview him in 2011 at the request of the russian government. officials are focusing on a trip he made to russia in 2012. sky news's katie sta
miranda rights? >> yes, that's my view. >> so that changes nothing in view of their ability to interrogate? >> what it changes is their ability to question him and use any statement that he makes. that they're not allowed to do. >> he is apparently claiming -- >> they don't need that in this case. they got a mountain of evidence against this guy. >> right. they have testified it seems against him and his brother for the act they perpetrated. >> correct. >> what they will i'm sure be extremely curious to find out if they can is are they part of a wider group of either like-minded individuals who have been coordinating themselves reading stuff on the internet, videos and so on, which apparently is what he's claiming. whether they're attached to anybody in chechnya, for example, or islamic fundamentalist nature, et cetera, et cetera, how far can you go in terms of eliciting that information from somebody like him in his position once he's had his miranda rights read to him as he now has? >> my view is you can go as far as you think it's productive to go. however, i don't think it's terribly p
time now we have a suspect who already was read his miranda rights. he already have a lawyer present. and i don't think that should affect any trained interrogator, any trained interviewer in doing their job. we have been doing this for many, many years. we did it against terrorist suspects, organized crimes, people who are charged with treason, spies, and it always worked, and it always gets the intended results. >> in terms of this breaking news that we've just got tonight. again, this is a senior government official saying that the initial interrogation of dzhokhar tsarnaev in his hospital bed, he says that he and his brother were not in touch with any overseas terrorists or groups. they conceived the attack on their own, motivated he told them by religious fervor. that's the language that i have been given. how -- how should that be approached in terms of strategically trying to unwind any threats that might exist beyond these young men? they're saying they acted alone. but presumably, the thing that made them want to do this could make other people want to do this as well. >> su
along this evening. should the captured terrorist lying in boston get miranda rights or should he be classified as an enemy combatant? later, bernie goldberg on how the media scoferght story. including the giant cnn screw up about an arrest that never happened. that never happened. hope you s years ago, my doctor told me to take a centrum silver multivitamin every day. i told him, sure. can't hurt, right? then i heard this news about a multivitamin study looking at long-term health benefits for men over 50. the one they used in that study... centrum silver. that's what i take. my doctor! he knows his stuff. [ male announcer ] centrum. the most recommended. most preferred. most studied. centrum, always your most complete. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer
with recovering right now. he's now arrested he was not read his miranda rights. federal agents electing, instead, to invoke the public safety threat exemption. th allows them to continue questioning him. meantime, on the other side of the police tape, as everything was happening here, of the celebrations were building. people were huddled around radios, as they got news they wanted to hear, cheers went out from the people of this little town, watertown. and after it was all done, a great cheer went out and spontaneously the people elected toine both sides of the road. forming a gauntlet, a makeshift parade as the emergency crews and tactical teams started leaving this location. they cheered for them, came out with patriotic songs. some of the people said they're glad it's over, they're glad that the suspect survived because he can be questioned. they also said that now is the time to remember people like sean collier, the massachusetts institute of technology campus policeman who was killed in the early stages of that frenzy and chase that ensued a day or so ago. and richard donohue who is fight
noth get his miranda rights. even though right now there's a public safety excmondtion thado going t in 48 hours and then he can >> that is what happened to the marathon bomber. he was a foreign citizen. he was read his miranda rights. muitics say the intelligence enm committee as to how the plot develops. bom he is now in super max. i r > officers and federal ey wthorities take him alive tis unlike his brother who perished in the fight they were trying hard becey wse they wanted to ay the questions as they go forward to speaght r > he is an american citie inn. he can't be sent to guantanamo a bay he can't be tried in a co military cowas rission. cases there are cases where americans were deemed enemy combatants. pl hosea padilla for one but in the case of him they have not found any link to an al qaeda linked group and therefore no court in the u.s. would necessarily rily uphold the president as r in commander-in-chief in designating him as enetinue ould combatant. this would be shaky i am told by experts.lleged even if he is deemed an enetinu he watant he has a right to an attorna
understand he has not been read his miranda rights, even if he can talk. what's the latest from the hospital? >> the latest official word from the hospital and through the f.b.i., the official channels releasing information is he's in serious condition and within the last 24 hours, that he's also in stable condition. so he is under the care of the physician here, clearly under heavy guard. we know he was shot in the throat because senator in the select intelligence committee has also given that information out. but that's really what we know for certain at this point in time. >> gretchen: there is this report this morning that maybe that throat wound was from an attempted suicide when the police were closing in on him, as you can see from the thermal imings of him in the boat friday night. what have you heard about that? >> well, that information doesn't come from the positions here -- physicians that are treating him and would have the closest eye view of his wounds. they're keeping all of his information to themselves as they're required to do by law and the f.b.i. not releasing that throu
administration has agreed to delay a reading of his miranda rights under a public safety exemption, secretary of defense chuck hagel has not seen evidence to link the bombings to terror groups. scrutiny turns to the fbi who reportedly questioned the older brother tamerlan in 2011 at the request of a foreign government. this is so interesting. of russia. the fbi told the a.p. despite interviewing him and relatives they did not find any activity. the agency dropped the ball. richard, i wonder if there is going to be a lot of questions and maybe even hearings out of this or what comes to mind just knowing those basic facts? >> there probably will be hearings of the fbi whether it learned more or could have done more. critics say that is monday morning quarterbacking. it ought to be about what we were talking about, what can we do to prevent or identify young people who are radicalized and how did we respond and how what did we learn about lockdowns. as the military would say it ought not to just focus on fbi. it's much bigger and much broader. we have to learn a lot from this. the reason is this
news tsarnaev will not be given a miranda warning when he's physically able to be interrogated after receiving medical treatment. instead, the official says the government will invoke a legal rule known as the public safety exception. that will allow investigators to question tsarnaev without first advising him of his right to remain silent and be afforded legal counsel. president obama used his weekly address today to praise law enforcement and those involved in tracking tsarnaev down. >> americans refused to be terrorized. ultimately, that's what we'll remember from this week. that's what will remain, the stories of heroism and kindness, resolve and resilience, generosity, and love. >> authorities caught up with the suspect after a tip from a watertown resident. he was hiding in a boat parked outside a home. he is now in a boston hospital and nbc's ron allen is joining me from there. ron, with a good afternoon to you, let's get the very latest on his condition. are you getting word from the hospital or are they staying somewhat silent on that? >> reporter: absolutely silent, alex.
dzhokhar tsarnaev to investigators, we do not know if that was before or after he received his miranda warnings or before or after he obtained counsel. that's an excellent point. one of the things we do know that he is saying apparently is that it was his brother tamerlan who was the mastermind here. is that something that could be helpful to his defense if he was merely following his brother? >> well, it will be helpful to his defense in the sense of mitigating the penalty that he might end up suffering. from what i've read and what i've seen, he's clearly as culpable as his brother. the videos that they picked up, and the statements that he made to the driver of the suv, all would indicate that he was a willing participant in this crime, and also the fact that he fled from the scene would further indicate his willingness to participate in this crime. however, any influence that he might have suffered from his brother, his brother's influence on him, may again go to mitigate any penalty that might be imposed upon him. whether he ends up getting the death penalty or whether he ends up
, let me come over to you, a lot of talk about miranda. but give me a sense of what the leeway is especially in situations like this, after acts like what happened here at the marathon. >> well, it is yesterday's news. he's been given his miranda warnings and probably anything he said without his miranda warnings is not going to be needed by the government or the prosecution. remember, they did not indict him as a terrorist, that's very important. they indicted him as an ordinary murderer, anybody who wants to kill their mother-in-law, business partner and makes an improvised explosive device and kills them is just as guilty under the statute indicted as osama bin laden might be. this is not a terrorist prosecution. they don't have to prove intent to terrorize, intent to intimidate. they can prove their case just through the videotapes. now, i predict there are going to be two types of possible defenses in this case. number one, the jihad defense. i did it, i'm proud, i'm happy, please kill me, i want to join my brother in paradise. i'm a martyr. the other, my brother made me d
decided not to read him miranda rights. he's not getting that. feds are envoking an exception to the rule and already the american civil liberties is slamming that decision . we must not waiver from the tried and true judicial system. we'll break down the complicated legal issuings. criminal defense attorney heather hanson is wherulse. >> you catch somebody who might have left a bomb somewhere . you want to keep them safe and question them right now for the public safety. >> that times passed hasn't it. >> the law was in 1984 . that is what it at that time. since then specifically after the times square bombing in 2010, >> attempted. >> the f.b.i. put out a memo that addresses the terrorist cases that they could expand the time in which they can question a suspect without reading them their rights. the question is how long of a time is there. we don't know the answer. >> was it not the letter of the law. but was it the intent of the law to stop an imminent threat against the people. for instance times square bomber had blown something out there and had blown something that the authorities
yet to be charged in connection with the attack or been notified of his miranda rights, however, this morning officials tell nbc news he's awake and using pen and paper to answer questions from investigators. all of this as the fbi says it has obtained surveillance footage showing tsarnaev putting down his backpack near the finish line just minutes before the explosion. massachusetts governor deval patrick says he's been briefed on the footage. >> the suspect took the backpack off, put it down, did not react when the first explosion went off and then moved away from the backpack in time for the second explosion, so pretty clear about his involvement and pretty chilling, frankly. >> all right, so while we wait on that video, i want you to look at these new infrared images released showing the final intense moments of the manhunt. stun grenades just exploded as police moved in to capture the 19-year-old, and it capped a nearly four-day search for dzhokhar and his older brother, tamerlan, and while the nation was reeling, we are getting word this morning that the brothers actually
are told he had not been given his miranda rights. do you have any sense of whether he has this morning or how soon it will be before he does receive them? >> the -- the decision not to read miranda rights was made by the federal officials. this is a unique clause to the terrorism law that we've not dealt with at the local level before. so, we are standing by and watching that at this point in time to see how that develops. but, the lawyers are involved in the decision, and certainly we're very anxious to talk to him, and the investigators will be doing that as soon as possible. >> commissioner over the weekend i heard you say you believe you found evidence your offices did you believe that these brothers were planning some kind of another attack, or at least prepared for it. tell us about that. >> the two suspects were armed with handguns at the scene of the shoot-out. and there were multiple explosive devices, including a large one that was similar to the pressure cooker device that was found on boylston street. i saw that with my own eyes. i believe that the only reason that someone
by a military tribunal and not read his miranda rights. yes, susan collins, a voice of reason and bipartisan reason. telling reporters that if the person apprehended happens to be a foreign national -- what a disgrace and what an insult to the american system of justice. and what ignorance. the fifth amendment of the constitution which protects the right to due process is quite clear about who it applies to. it reads no person shall be held to answer for capital or otherwise infamous crime unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury. nor be deprived of life, liberty of process. not no citizen, no person. french national is arrested in a bar fight, he gets access to a lawyer, is arraigned, charged and tried. we don't have some special carve out in the law for foreigners. our laws are our laws. and yet 12 years after the horrors of 9/11, we created a new special carved out area of law. we have a republican rushing to repeat the same mistakes, to place the perpetrators outside of our normal league system. susan collins should take the time to read the report. it is a useful, timely re
the question this is exactly the whole issue going back to the miranda, if he had the public safety concern of what were those explosive devices intended for? that's one of the reasons they wanted to talk to him or one of the things thaw wanted to talk to him about at the time before they realized how severely hurt he was. it absolutely proves the point there could have more more attacks planned or another person who was a part of it who maybe at the last minute didn't do it. another reason to think there was more planned is maybe that's why they didn't kill themselves at the time of the marathon attack. they wanted to live to attack another day. >> jeff, somebody must have trained them. can you learn to build a bomb by yourself just by going to the internet and going out there, go to a home depot and buying this kind of stuff? >> you could try to learn, but what you would certainly want to do is rehearse. you don't want to go through the operational energy that it would take to mount an attack like at the marathon without having a fair degree of confidence that your device is going to work
was given his miranda rights? >> we don't know as of yet. he has been read his miranda rights. but we don't know if this information came before or after. as you know there was a public safety exemption before he was read his miranda rights. so there was time when law enforcement had the opportunity to talk to him before he had quote/unquote lawyered up. but we don't know yet whether or not this information came before he said he understood his rights, or after. >> all right, jake tapper, terrific reporting. great to have you here this morning. >> thanks, john. >> don't miss "the lead" every day at 4:00. we're also learning more this morning about -- we're learning more this morning about criminal complaints against tsarnaev detailing step by step how the deadly attack on the boston marathon unfolded. our coverage continues this morning with miguel marquez outside best israel deaconess medical center right here in boston. good morning, miguel. >> good morning, john. this is the criminal complaint that contains what we expect are the first charges. we'll see many more against mr. tsarnaev.
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